Things to Do in Taiwan in February

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In February, the winter is coming to an end in Taiwan, but the weather can still be quite changeable. Expect (mostly) warm sunny days in the south, yet don’t get too frustrated when occasional rain in the north keeps you penned indoors. That being said, always bring an umbrella when traveling to the north. As Chinese New Year and Lantern Festival both tend to fall in February depending on the year, culture buffs will be thrilled at the chance to travel in Taiwan during the month of Februaryfestive celebrations everywhere!

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Things to Do in Taiwan in January

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In Taiwan, the coldest time of the year starts in January. It can be cool and/or cloudy and most homes are not heated. Northerners shiver as the mercury hovers around 10°C, while the south usually doesn’t get too cold. However, winter jackets and gloves are still essential when you are out early in the morning or late at night. For most people out there, January is not the best time to be traveling weather-wise, but we are telling you: Winter is no less fun than summer in Taiwan. Read on and you’ll never have a boring winter day again!

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Things to Do in Taiwan in December

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Winter officially starts from December, but visitors to Taiwan in December can still enjoy most outdoor attractions as the weather stays mild. However, there is a very remarkable difference in temperature between day and night. Expect the unexpected, in today’s climatic chaos, and be prepared. As central heating is not a common way of life here, some might need to sleep in the tracking suit, bed cover plus sleeping bag (okay, that’s a bit exaggerated) so they won’t freeze. Unlike North America and Europe, winter months in Taiwan are anything but “sleeping” holidays. The activity level will be the same as ever. The island is very vibrant, full of festivity but still in working condition. Nothing is closed on Christmas day. Nothing. So put your mind at rest and enjoy your trip of a lifetime.

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Things to Do in Taiwan in November

With the mild weather and little rain, November is no doubt the best month to visit Taiwan. It is the low season when you get best discounts on accommodation at major tourist sights (up to 50%) yet the high season for hot-spring hotels. Even though the island doesn’t really experience snow (but anything is possible in these days of abnormal weather at abnormal times…), the weather can still be chilly, especially in the mountainous areas. If Taiwan’s subtropical climate scares you off, a visit in November will be a sheer delight.

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Things to Do in Taiwan in October

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October is no doubt the best time of the year for traveling around Taiwan. You get to avoid the huge crowd but still have fairly pleasant weather, cheaper prices and access to still-open attractions. It is also the best time to visit outer islands such as Penghu, Xiaoliuqiu and Lanyu. The northeast monsoon lasts about six months from October to late March and brings wet weather to the northeast side of the island, while central and southern regions stay relatively dry. In October, average low and high temperatures are 23 °C (74 °F) and 26 °C (79 °F), cooling a bit from the scorching summer heat, especially in the north. We have put together a Forrest Gump-type list of all the wonderful things to do in Taiwan in October. If you are already tempted by those good discounts on accommodation and flights, why not take a look at it?

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Top 10 Winter-Warmer Hot Pots in Taiwan

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Even though the south of Taiwan has a tropical monsoon climate and the north is subtropical, winter in Taiwan can still feel mighty cold. And while there is no doubt that winters in Taiwan are short and sweet, a lack of heating in buildings can sometimes make them feel even harder to bear than those the winters of Europe! But luckily Taiwan has a remedy: hot pot. Indeed, as the weather gets colder in Taiwan, the hot pots get hotter.

Ranging from approximately TWD100 to 1000, hot pots in Taiwan come in all sorts of different flavors and styles. But whether you eat it to fight off colds or for pure enjoyment, hot pot in Taiwan is not to miss. Here we have compiled a list of our favorite ten winter-warmers to get you started!

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Taiwan’s Top 10 Museums

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Certainly if you are heading to Europe, the great museums of Paris, London or Berlin will be first on your to-do list. But if you are coming to Taiwan, museums might not be the first thing that comes to mind! Nevertheless, Taiwan has a healthy museum culture, with both unique and traditional curatorship and many interesting objects on display. Museums are a great choice any day, but perhaps they are even better kept up your sleeve for those typically Taiwanese sweltering days (or rainy ones!) as a pleasant escape from the elements. Here we have compiled a list of museums exhibiting riches as diverse as ancient Chinese artefacts, incense and even sugar. There is a museum to suit everyone in Taiwan.

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Taiwan’s Top 10 Temples

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Religion in Taiwan is rich in diversity and history and is a key part of the lives of many Taiwanese people. Indeed, some say that the Taiwanese don’t just follow the religion, but actually “live” it, their daily routines and special rites of passages shaped by the will of the gods. Although there are also many Christians in Taiwan, most Taiwanese practice Confucianism, Daoism or Buddhism- and many actually practice them all at the same time! Perhaps this is because Taiwanese temples tend to come in and out of popularity depending on their efficacy. That is, one temple might be the chosen destination for those wanting good exam results, while another might be ideal for those wanting children. Listed here are Taiwan’s top 10 most interesting temples, from those made of sea shells, to those in caves, to those shaped like phalluses. Here you will find something to suit any need, and every curiosity!

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Top 10 Taiwanese Restaurants

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Taiwan has been called the food capital of the world by the CNN, so it would be absolutely criminal to miss out on good old-style Taiwanese cuisine while visiting. But although there is a huge number of Taiwanese style restaurants offering a wide range of different delicacies, sometimes it can be really hard to know where to go. Here, we have compiled a list of our top 10 Taiwanese style restaurants in Taiwan. All of them are relatively upmarket, offering a great dining experience and delicious food. There is something here to suit everyone, from vegetarian food, to Chinese duck, from all-you-can-eat to Bubble Tea. Enjoy!

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